Not Sure Which US Coins to Collect 5


With all of the US Coins out there, it’s not always easy to decide what you want to collect. I wrote this post in hope of helping you decide what you want to collect.

Personal Example

Back in 2000, when trying to think of something to collect, I decided to put together an Uncirculated War Nickels collection. War Nickels were Jefferson Nickels that were minted between 1942 and 1945. They were made of 35% silver and they had larger than normal mint marks above Monticello on the reverse. By 2001, I had 9 out of the 11 nickels slabbed by NGC. Unfortunately, I was laid off from my job that year and stopped collecting for 13 years. Earlier this year, I went through what I had and noticed I was missing the 1942-S and 1945-P. Needless to say, I got both of them to complete the set. They are all MS-67 except for the 1945-P which is MS-66. I finished it, but may try to improve it by getting an MS-67 1945-P and the only silver proof, 1942-P.

This is to show that you I didn’t have to collect a complete Jefferson Nickels collection. Instead I thought of doing a short set of Jeffersons and chose the condition and composition of the coins as well.

Collection Suggestion

I built an app called the Collection Suggestion. This will go through 4 categories, Level, Number of Coins, Conditions and Composition. You select one of the options under each category and a pop up will appear with up to 5 suggestions for you. Right now, there are mostly 20th century coins included. There are a few 19th century coins like Indian Cents and Barber Coins, and hope to add more later.

Categories

  1. Level – Do you want to work on an easy collection, or something more challenging?
  2. Number of Coins – Maybe you want to do a short set under 50 coins, or a big collection like Lincoln cents.
  3. Condition – You want to collect circulated coins like you find in pocket change, or maybe coins that were only released from the US mint, like uncirculated and proof coins.
  4. Composition – You can select from Silver, Clad or Silver and Clad compositions. I haven’t included gold yet.

Give Collection Selection a Shot

It’s free and easy to use.

Click here to get more information. You can also go to the Collection Selection Page under Research.

Click here to try out the Collection Selection App.

Let me know what you think of it.


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5 thoughts on “Not Sure Which US Coins to Collect

  • Rachel Annie

    Hey! So glad I found your site! My dad is very into collecting coins, and I have no idea what to get him as a present to help him along. He is very interested in collecting coins as an investment, hoping to sell his collections about 15 years down the road as part of his retirement plan.
    I’m not sure he will get what he thinks he will, do you think 15 years will be enough time to build a collection worth selling? How big of a profit margin could he potentially see?
    What kinds of coins can I start looking for to help him out? And where do i go about finding these coins?
    Sorry for all the questions, but I really want to make sure I’m helping him towards his goal and not just collecting coins that are not exciting or going to help him with his financial goals.
    Thanks so much!!

    • Kevin Post author

      I’m glad you found my site too! That’s nice of you helping you dad in collecting coins. If he’s interested in investing in coins, he should consider buying silver or gold coins.

      Gold is currently around $1,300 an ounce so gold coins will cost hundreds of dollars to get. My friend and I were thinking about getting $2.50 Indian Heads between 1908 and 1929. Most low end mint state coins go for $400 – $500 each. The tough one to get would be 1911-D which would be over $5,000 to get.

      If gold is out of your range, try silver coins. Right now, silver is under $20 an ounce so now is the time to buy. In terms of investing, some like going for silver dollars like Morgan Dollars and Peace Dollars. I’ve worked on Peace Dollars and got all but 1 of the 24 dollars.

      Of course, this is just touching the surface. Hope this helps you get an idea. I’ll keep adding to this blog so come back often.

      Thanks again for the comment! Kevin

  • Rachel Annie

    Hey! So glad I found your site! My dad is very into collecting coins, and I have no idea what to get him as a present to help him along. He is very interested in collecting coins as an investment, hoping to sell his collections about 15 years down the road as part of his retirement plan.
    I’m not sure he will get what he thinks he will, do you think 15 years will be enough time to build a collection worth selling? How big of a profit margin could he potentially see?
    What kinds of coins can I start looking for to help him out? And where do i go about finding these coins?
    Sorry for all the questions, but I really want to make sure I’m helping him towards his goal and not just collecting coins that are not exciting or going to help him with his financial goals.
    Thanks so much!!

  • Kevin

    Hey
    Great post. I started to collect US coins with my son a few years ago and I was fascinated by the whole process. I had never realized how much actually went into it . From the grading to the different mints. He lost interest after awhile but I have kinda kept my hand in. Is always nice to find a coin somewhere that you were looking for. Keep up the good work. Happy coin hunting.
    Kevin.

    • Kevin Post author

      Thanks for the comment! Glad to hear you are interested in coins. It would be nice if your son decided to collect again so you both can enjoy the hobby together. Happy coin hunting to you too!