Build a US Type Set 13


If you don’t want to collect a set of just one type of coin, why not build a set of each different US coin. Type sets can be fun to build and you decide which coins to include. One of the most popular type sets is the 20th Century Type Set. With the 20th Century Set, you could build a complete uncirculated set or if you are daring enough, a proof set.

You could try to collect every single type coin since the US mint opened in 1792, but coins like the 1792 Half Disme or the Gobrecht Dollar will be out of reach, unless you win the lottery. Around 1998, I started working on a type set but stopped working on it in 2001. My type set has 79 coins to collect in all, and so far I am up to 50.

The Type Set I am Building

Half Cents

  • Draped Bust – 1800 – 1808
  • Classic Head – 1809 – 1836
  • Braided Hair or Coronet – 1840 – 1857

Large Cents

  • Draped Bust – 1796 – 1807
  • Classic Head – 1808 – 1814
  • Coronet or Matron Head – 1816 – 1836
  • Braided Hair – 1837 – 1857

Indian and Lincoln Cents

Small Cents

  • Flying Eagle 1856 – 1858
  • Indian Head 1859 (Copper Nickel with no Shield on Reverse)
  • Indian Head 1860 – 1864 (Copper Nickel with Shield)
  • Indian Head 1864 – 1909 (Copper)
  • Lincoln 1909-P VDB
  • Lincoln 1909 – 1958 (Wheat Reverse)
  • Lincoln 1943 (Steel)
  • Lincoln 1959 – 2008 (Memorial Reverse)

Two Cent – 1864 – 1873

Three Cent

  • Silver – 1851 – 1853 (No lines bordering star)
  • Silver – 1854 – 1858 (Two lines bordering star)
  • Silver – 1859 – 1873 (One line bordering star)
  • Nickel – 1865 – 1889

Half Dimes

  • Capped Bust 1829 – 1837 (No Stars on Obverse)
  • Seated Liberty 1837 – 1838 (Stars on Obverse)
  • Seated Liberty 1838 – 1860 (Arrows at Date)
  • Seated Liberty 1853 – 1855 (Stars on Obverse)
  • Seated Liberty 1860 – 1873 (United States of America on Obverse)

Liberty Buffalo and Jefferson Nickels

Nickels

  • Shield 1866- 1867 (Rays between Stars)
  • Shield 1867 – 1883 (No Rays)
  • Liberty 1883 (Without Cents on Reverse)
  • Liberty 1883 – 1912 (With Cents on Reverse)
  • Buffalo 1913 (Buffalo on Mound)
  • Buffalo 1913 – 1938
  • Jefferson 1938 – Present
  • Jefferson 1942 – 1945 (Silver)

Dimes

  • Capped Bust 1828 – 1837
  • Seated Liberty 1837 – 1860 (Either Stars or no Stars on Obverse)
  • Seated Liberty 1853 – 1855 (Arrows at Date)
  • Seated Liberty 1860 – 1891 (United States of America on Obverse)
  • Seated Liberty 1873 – 1874 (Arrows at Date)
  • Barber 1892 – 1916
  • Mercury 1916 – 1945
  • Roosevelt 1946 – 1964 (Silver)
  • Roosevelt 1965 – Present (Clad)

Twenty Cent – 1875 – 1878

Quarters

  • Capped Bust 1831 – 1838
  • Seated Liberty 1838 – 1865 (Without In God We Trust)
  • Seated Liberty 1853 – 1855 (Arrows at Date, 1853 has Rays around Eagle)
  • Seated Liberty 1866 – 1891 (In God We Trust above Eagle)
  • Seated Liberty 1873 – 1874 (Arrows at Date)
  • Barber 1892 – 1916
  • Standing Liberty 1916 – 1917 (No Stars Below Eagle)
  • Standing Liberty 1917 – 1930 (Stars Below Eagle)
  • Washington 1932 – 1964 (Silver)
  • Washington 1965 – Present (Clad)
  • Washington 1976 (Bicentennial)

Half Dollars

  • Capped Bust 1807 – 1836 (Lettering on Edge)
  • Capped Bust 1836 – 1839 (Reeded Edge)
  • Seated Liberty 1839 – 1865 (Without In God We Trust)
  • Seated Liberty 1853 – 1855 (Arrows at Date, 1853 had Rays above Eagle)
  • Seated Liberty 1866 – 1891 (In God We Trust above Eagle)
  • Seated Liberty 1873 – 1974 (Arrows at Date)
  • Barber 1892 – 1915
  • Walking Liberty 1916 – 1947
  • Franklin 1948 – 1963
  • Kennedy 1964 (90% Silver)
  • Kennedy 1965 – 1970 (40% Silver)
  • Kennedy 1971 – Present (Clad)
  • Kennedy 1976 (Bicentennial)

Trade Morgan and Peace Dollars

Dollars

  • Seated Liberty 1840 – 1865 (Without In God We Trust)
  • Seated Liberty 1866 – 1873 (In God We Trust above Eagle)
  • Trade 1873 – 1878
  • Morgan 1878 – 1921
  • Peace 1921 – 1935
  • Eisenhower 1971 – 1978
  • Eisenhower 1976 (Bicentennial)
  • Susan B Anthony (1979 – 1981)

Four Commemoratives

Would you Consider Building your own Type Set?

Like I said, you can include whatever coins you want. It’s your set after all.

You can start collecting US Type Coins on Ebay.

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13 thoughts on “Build a US Type Set

  • Mariam

    Wow, what an amazing gift that you have! I just want to be real to you. How did you start thinking about collecting coins in the first place? I read through your site and seen some of the other pages, not all.
    Ad I was asking myself that question, so I said why not ask you the author yourself. You have the answers.
    Keep it up very very interesting and educative.

    • Kevin Post author

      Thank you for the comment. I was 11 when I started collecting coins. My brother had some of those blue Whitman folders, but was never really interested. So, I took them and started filling in the holes. I also had two friends that also were interested in collecting.

  • Tharry Salley

    WOW! I never knew there was so much to coins. I guess I never really paid attention. What got you so involved with coins? I can really see the work and research you put into your site. I never knew they were categorized using things like hair. I have truly learned something.

  • John

    Very interesting article. I guess a lot of people build a type set as a hobby and for fun but can you earn money doing that or create a type set as a type of investment?

    My friend started collecting coins as an investment. I wonder how he is doing. Anyway I enjoyed your article and learned something new.

    • Kevin Post author

      You can make a type set as an investment. Some collectors go for lower grade coins just to complete it quicker. Investors would go for higher grade coins and ones harder to get. It all depends on what you want to do.

  • bob

    a type set can be as individual and unique as the collector. a collection can be creative too, not just filling holes in albums.

    • Kevin Post author

      That’s true. Just like an individual coin set. You could do short sets, just uncirculated or proof. Whatever you can think of. There are no bad ideas in coin collecting.

  • zach

    Wow, you really seem to be an expert in your field. I collected coins as a young boy and have thought about getting back into it. Building a US coin set is a really good idea for anyone involved in coin collecting. I really liked how you categorized all the coins. I might start doing this myself.

    • Kevin Post author

      I am not an expert, but I hope this blog helps me become one. I hope you do decide to do a type set. Thanks for the comment.

  • Ronald Kennedy

    Since the US mint started producing coins back in the 17th century, coin collecting wasn’t that popular. Later in the years, coin collectors started cropping up all over.

    Different coins were printed up during different time periods, as your site has demonstrated. The coins that would go out of print, probably were destroyed in bulk amounts.

    So how did some of those coins avoid destruction No one knows. Later through the years, when these coins resurfaced this is what made them rare.

    When I was a young buck back in the day, I collected baseball cards. Never realizing coin collecting would be a ‘big thing’. I never saw the value in it.

    Like baseball cards increase in value, certain coins minted in a particular year would also end up as a collectors item.

    Your site list a lot of different coins with the year and provide valuable information for all future collectors.

    • Kevin Post author

      Thanks for the comment. In the early years of US coins, people would hoard coins more than collect, because of silver or gold content. Some even would shave some of the coins to sell the silver to make more of a profit.

      I think whatever you collect, whether coin, stamps or cards, there will be some rarer than others. Also a lot of silver and gold coins have been melted making some more rarer.